Christian Perspective On Homosexual Conduct

Introduction And Definitions

Homosexual behavior is portrayed in our modern times as a normal lifestyle which ought to be recognized and be accepted by the society. Pro-gay’s movies, and T.V. shows devoted to promote same sexual practice as delightful, enjoyable and shameful-less are rapidly increasing . The church is at the center of this moral storm, as it pauses a stabling block against homosexual practices and refusing to accept same-sex marriage.

Should the Christians let go of  their ground in condemning homosexual behavior and same-sex marriage in the name pro-gay’s reinterpretation of the Bible, tolerance and diversity? Is the Scripture clear on this topic? In this series of articles, I would attempt to answer these questions with gentleness and respect, showing that the Scriptural teachings are strongly and clearly against homosexual behavior.

Distinguishing Homosexuality and Homosexual Behavior

Homosexuality and homosexual behavior are two non-synonymous terms often confused when discussing the Christian’s perspective on same sexual conduct.

In these series of articles, I will hold to a presumption that homosexuality could be a result of nurture and/or nature, thus one’s sexual predisposition is not normally something a person freely chooses but finds himself or herself with. Thus a person may find himself or herself attracted to the same sex but refuse to act out on it, knowing to do so would be going against God’s words.

A person who is tagged homosexual, a 19th century’s psychological term, is a person whom experiences predominating sexual attraction toward another person of the same gender, while a gay is and individual who practices sexual intercourse between with another person of same gender. Thus all gays are homosexuals but not all homosexuals are gays.

The Bible does not morally condemn homosexual orientation, but homosexual behavior. It limits the sexual activity to the safe confines of heterosexual bond of a man and his wife

N.B: The Bible condemns all sexual conducts outside  marriage bond: prostitution (1 Cor. 6:15–18), incest (Lev. 20:11–21; 1 Cor. 5:1–2), bestiality, (Lev. 18:23; 20:15–16) adultery” (Ex. 20:14) e.t.c

The true “orientation” of Christians is not what we are by constitution, but what we are by choice.

– John R. W. Stott

Next: Pausing Homosexual Behavior Ethical Problem

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26 thoughts on “Christian Perspective On Homosexual Conduct

  1. [You asked me: “Alex, what would you consider an accurate exegesis regarding the Bible’s references to gods other than Yahweh or false gods? (I don’t have any specific verses in mind, so I’ll let you choose.) Does that mean there really were other gods in existence when the Bible was divinely inspired, and if so, do those other gods still exist? If there never were any gods besides Yahweh, is this a slam dunk against biblical inerrancy?”]

    REMEMBER THAT THESE “GODS” WERE NOTHING MORE THAN THE FORCES OF NATURE PERSONIFIED.

    What looked like a simple story about Baal and other gods was really what people in the Ancient world knew about how the forces of nature interacted. How did the spring and fall rains come about? What caused the dry season of sterility? What could be done to lessen the influence of the dry season and make sure the rains came in abundance. Abundance, but not too much, lest the crops be destroyed by mildew and blight.

    Hence, ancient paganism was a worship of and bondage to the forces of nature. Indeed, the word “pagan” meaning country person, meant a person who still worshiped the nature gods rather than accepting the one God of Christianity WHO STOOD ENTIRELY OUTSIDE OF NATURE AND HAD ABSOLUTE CONTROL OVER ALL THE FORCES OF NATURE, SINCE HE CREATED THEM.

    So here we find a great gulf between Judaism and Christianity on the one hand, and ancient pagan religions on the other. For the pagan religions, “god” really meant the sum total of Nature (with a capital “N”) or the Universe (capital “U”) in the same sense that modern New Agers and witches worship nature and its parts as gods. For the Jews and the Christians, this was a huge mistake: a worship of creation rather than the Creator.

    As you can hopefully begin to see, it matters in doing exegesis whether you have sufficient background to interpret a given passage. Most modern readers wouldn’t have a clue what these passages were about, and neither would we, if ancient Ugarit hadn’t been recovered.

    -Alex Haiken
    http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

  2. Prayson, you stated above: “I am looking forward to your corrections to areas which I may have misrepresent pro-gay’s position.”

    Please understand that I do not classify my position as either “pro-gay” or “anti-gay”. My position (and my goal and focus) is always, as already stated, pro-responsible exegesis, that is to say, seeking to draw out from the of the text what it originally meant to the author and to the original intended audience, without reading into it the many traditional interpretations that may have grown up around it.

    Exegesis is reading out from the Bible what the original writers were saying.
    Eisegesis is reading one’s own ideas or prejudices back into the Bible.

    Exegesis is about getting out of the text what is truly there in the first place.
    Eisegesis is about putting into the text something never intended by the author.

    Exegesis is drawing out the true meaning of a Bible passage.
    Eisegesis is at best unwise, and at worst extremely dangerous.

    -Alex Haiken
    http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

  3. Prayson, while the Bible recognizes “male-to-male sex” in the instance you cited, the specific offense here was pagan idolatry, not “homosexuality” per se, for as you rightly acknowledged, “homosexuality” and “heterosexuality” were categories that were not even on their radar — therefore they were never what was being discussed.

    Let’s take that a step further. As mentioned in the same post, one of the most prominent and pervasive themes weaving its way through just about every book of the Old and New Testaments is that of paganism and the constant call to turn away from it. God is continually calling His people to turn from the worshiping of false or pagan gods and to turn instead to the one true living God, Yahweh. It is in connection with this that we find the admonitions to turn from participating in a multitude of pagan cult rituals or practices. But since these practices are now extinct, most of us have no idea what these were and they’re totally foreign to our contemporary thinking. As a result, statements like those found, for example, in the Leviticus text you cite, may appear clear on the surface, but their application and context are not.

    Here’s an analogy to help you grasp this: When the Bible speaks negatively of “tax collectors,” we realize that it’s not talking about modern IRS agents. Tax collectors in Jesus’ day were frequently corrupt and cheated people out of more money than they owed. So when the Bible talks about “tax collectors,” it’s not condemning all tax collectors for all time; it’s condemning the specific behaviors of the tax collectors at that time. As former professor of biblical exegesis F.F. Bruce rightly pointed out, “It is not enough to say ‘The Bible says’ without at the same time considering, to whom the Bible says it, and in what circumstances.”

    Remember the key to responsible interpretation is responsible exegesis. Exegesis requires that we work to DRAW OUT of the text what it originally meant to the author and to the original intended audience, without reading INTO the text the many traditional interpretations that may have grown up around it. The reader today must somehow try to enter the world of the biblical writer and seek to understand what the writer was saying. If we fail to pay attention to the world in which the Bible was written, we will simply read biblical texts, infuse them with meaning from our social and symbolic world and conclude that the Bible speaks directly to us.

    In contrast to this, what far too many do instead is what some theologians refer to as “frontloading”. That is to say, they read their own personal, political or ideological beliefs back into the Bible, instead of reading out from the Bible what the original writers were saying. This process of reading one’s own ideas into interpretation of the Bible is called “eisegesis”. Exegesis and eisegesis are conflicting approaches to interpreting the Bible. Exegesis does not allow for tearing a passage from its context to replace it in another age for convenience.

    -Alex Haiken
    http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

    • “God is continually calling His people to turn from the worshiping of false or pagan gods and to turn instead to the one true living God, Yahweh.”

      Alex, what would you consider an accurate exegesis regarding the Bible’s references to gods other than Yahweh or false gods? (I don’t have any specific verses in mind, so I’ll let you choose.) Does that mean there really were other gods in existence when the Bible was divinely inspired, and if so, do those other gods still exist? If there never were any gods besides Yahweh, is this a slam dunk against biblical inerrancy?

      • Thanks Alex. I did see your reply in my RSS feed. Something atheists like to point out is that the Bible came from an ancient polytheistic culture that attributed all sorts of natural occurrences to gods, and your reply to me seems to support that. (Correct me if I’m wrong.) Given that, how would you respond to the premise that God (Yahweh) was just another god dreamed up by these ancient people?

      • Brap, another good question! Well as a Jewish believer in Christ, I’ve always maintained that one of the greatest “evidences” to support the notion that God (Yahweh) is not just another god that the ancients dreamed up is the messianic prophecies of the Hebrew Scriptures, otherwise known as the Old Testament. God, through the prophets of Israel, provided over 300 prophecies concerning this promised Messiah who would one day step onto the stage of human history. Each was fulfilled uniquely and specifically by Jesus Christ and they establish a solid confirmation of his credentials as the Messiah.

        Significantly it could not have been simply the result of a select group of people who came together to formulate such an intricate plan, for the Hebrew Scriptures were written over a 1,000 year span and by more than 30 different authors. This eliminates any possibility of editorial manipulation because the prophecies were written by different people who lived in different places and at different times in history — yet each pointing to the same one individual. More pointedly, the prophecies encompass a wealth of identifying characteristics about him. There were prophecies of his ancestry, his pre-existence, his birth, his character, his ministry, his dual nature, his death, his resurrection, and on and on.

        In fact if we look at the Bible (the Old and New Testaments combined) as one continuous story (which it is), it might rightly be said that the PRIMARY point of the New Testament is that Jesus Christ is the Messiah of the Old Testament. Old Testament messianic prophecy and New Testament fulfilment is, I believe, one of the most compelling evidences of the Christian faith. As a Jewish man, this evidence was central to my own acceptance of Jesus as Israel’s Messiah. As another Jewish believer (Marv Rosenthal) once aptly put it, “To suggest that mere men maneuvered and manipulated to make the myriad of events surrounding the birth of Christ [to cite just one example] fit the Old Testament pattern is ludicrous. Far easier would it be to disassemble a complex watch, throw the dismembered parts into a running clothes dryer and believe that in due course, given enough time, the watch would be whole, running on time, and to the very second.”

        I think anyone who takes the time and trouble to examine the evidence will find more than enough evidence to support that notion that God (Yahweh) is not just another god that the ancients dreamed up.

        -Alex Haiken
        http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

      • Thanks again Alex. (And thanks to Prayson for letting us use the comment section of his blog for this discussion.)

        You say the messianic prophecies are one of the greatest “evidences” to support the notion that Yahweh is not just another god the ancients dreamed up, and that the Bible can be viewed as one continuous story (OT through NT). If you had been living during the years somewhere in the middle of the story, let’s say in the year 10 BC, what would have convinced you that Yahweh is indeed the one true God?

      • Brap, you ask: “You say the messianic prophecies are one of the greatest “evidences” to support the notion that Yahweh is not just another god the ancients dreamed up, and that the Bible can be viewed as one continuous story (OT through NT). If you had been living during the years somewhere in the middle of the story, let’s say in the year 10 BC, what would have convinced you that Yahweh is indeed the one true God?”

        I think you partially answered your own question. The Bible is indeed one continuous story. It’s a grand narrative or history of God dealing with his people. One of the great differences between Judaism and Christianity on the one side and other faiths and religions on the other, is that whereas other faiths are by and large about man’s attempts to find God, Judaism and Christianity are exactly the opposite. They are about God’s efforts to reveal himself to man. It’s always been about God taking the initiative — not only to reveal himself to His people but also to continually call them back to Himself when they wander.

        Clearly, God’s ultimate revelation came with the Incarnation, that special time in history when the God who created matter took shape within it, as an artist might become a spot on one of his paintings, or a playwright a character within his own play. But as we look back at this grand history of God dealing with his people, we see that He has hardly been a silent or absentee God.

        There was a time when God spoke to Moses face to face, as you and I would speak to a friend. They met together in a tent, pitched just outside the Israelite camp. Everyone knew it was happening. Whenever Moses went to the tent to meet with God, the whole nation turned out to watch. A pillar of cloud, which was God’s visible presence, blocked the entrance to the tent. Only Moses knew what God had said, but the people knew that God had been present, because when Moses came out of that tent, he was glowing like a space alien. The people couldn’t even bear to look at him until he covered his face with a veil. No one doubted God was with them. They could see his presence in the thick storm clouds around Mt Sinai. If anyone wanted to test the reality of God’s presence, they only had to touch the mountain to be convinced, for they would be dead a second later. God wasn’t playing hide and seek with these people. He was there in a pillar of cloud by day, and in a pillar of fire at night. He fed them every day with supernatural food. These people had crossed over a sea on dry ground. They had drunk water from a rock. They had every proof of God’s existence you could ask for. But here’s the rub: Did they trust him more when His presence was so real, present and miraculous? These same people got bored with God. They grew impatient with him. They complained about him. Even though God gave them every reason to trust him, they made a golden calf as an idol, and worshipped that instead.

        Here’s the staggering thing. The more God revealed himself, the less people trusted Him. The more miracles people saw, the less they believed. Those Israelites who wandered in the desert, had a 24 hour/day reminder of the presence of God, yet they rebelled against him repeatedly.

        If God answered every prayer you prayed and if He worked miracles in your life on a daily basis, so that every day you could count on him to provide your food, speak to you with specific instructions, and lead you in the direction you needed to go, would you trust Him? What if God visibly showed up with solid proof of his presence? Would you trust Him? Well, that’s exactly what He did with the Israelites and how did they respond?

        God has always provided ample evidence to convince that He (Yahweh) is indeed the one true God. As the Apostle Paul put it in Romans 1, “What may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them. For since the creation of the world God’s invisible qualities — his eternal power and divine nature — have been clearly seen, being understood from what has been made, so that men are without excuse.”

        -Alex Haiken
        http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

      • So if you were living in the year 10 BC, how would you go about determining for yourself how much, if any, of the Pentateuch was literally true, and how much was allegory, figurative, or metaphor?

      • Brap, you began by asking if there really were other gods in existence when the Bible was divinely inspired, and if so, do those other gods still exist. And I think we addressed that question adequately. You then asked how one would respond to the premise that God (Yahweh) was just another “god” dreamed up by the ancient people. And I think we addressed that one adequately as well. Then you came back with wanting to know, if one had been living somewhere in the middle of the Bible story prior to the time of Christ, how one would be convinced that Yahweh is indeed the one true God. And I think we addressed that one adequately too. Now you’re asking additional questions that firstly, can’t be satisfactorily addressed in a simple blog reply and secondly, I think it would be unfair to use Prayson’s blog as an ongoing Q&A between you and me for all questions having to do with Bible.

        The question, like your others, is a good one. But here’s where rather than get spoon fed, you’ve entered a realm of questioning in which if you truly want to know the answer, this is going to require that you roll up your sleeves and invest some time and energy in personal study. The Pentateuch contains all of that which you referenced and more. As we read thru the five books of Moses, we move thru history, law, poetry, wisdom, song, prophecy, symbolism, apocalyptic literature, and more. And the fact is they’re not necessarily mutually exclusive. Symbolism, for example, is poetry; it deliberately operates on multiple levels and can correctly be intended to convey more than one meaning at a time. And the Hebrews knew that passage that contains symbolism is not necessarily un-historical. But when know the type or genre of the literature we’re reading we can understand it better. We read history, for example, different from how we read poetry. Different genres invoke different expectations and interpretive strategies.

        May I presume that by simply asking the question you’ve concluded that Yahweh is indeed the one true God and not just another “god” dreamed up by these ancient people? And therefore investing your time and energy to study and learn how to responsibly read and interpret the Bible in order to better get to know this one true God who has gone to such great lengths to reveal himself to you and me is a worthy investment of your time?

        I’d like to hear more from Prayson since this is his blog. He is put forth that he can “prove” that any and all homosexual behavior is sinful. I maintain that the only way he can attempt to do that is to completely bypass any semblance of responsible exegesis and tear passages from their context to replace them in another age for convenience. But I think we need to give him an opportunity to present his case.

        -Alex Haiken
        http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

      • No problem Alex. I appreciate your thorough responses so far. I agree that letting Prayson continue his case would be more appropriate at this point.

        Since you asked, no, I have not concluded that Yahweh is the one true God. I think I’ve been a lifelong atheist deep down, but I didn’t really start looking into the arguments for either side until about three years ago. To say my reasoning has changed in those past three years would be an understatement. My latest question in this thread is my current “sticking point,” which is essentially why I doubt the historical accuracy of significant parts of the NT. It sounds like it might take a fair amount of study on my part to be convinced otherwise, but I do read material from opposing views, having read “The Case for Christ” and “Mere Christianity,” with Chesterton’s “The Everlasing Man” next on my list. So feel free to recommend any books that might help change my perception of the OT, and I’ll add them to my list.

      • Well it’s not Old Testament, but I’d recommend “The Jesus I Never Knew” by Philip Yancey. He has an uncanny ability to take theological issues and bring them down to earth, explaining them in a clear, logical, relatable, thoughtful and entertaining way. He’s one of my favorite Christian authors and the “The Jesus I Never Knew” is one of my favorite books by him. I can promise you an enjoyable, thoughtful and worthwhile read.

        -Alex Haiken
        http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

  4. Thanks Alex,

    You are correct that “homosexuality” and “heterosexuality” categories were not even on the radar. They are after all 19th century’s psychological term. But I would sadly disagree with you that the Bible does not recognize sexual intercourse with the same sex(/concept to which these terms were coined).

    In your June 19, 2011 article: A Good Life in the Closet?, you seam to agree with scholar Christopher Wright, that “Genital-anal intercourse between men, and both male and female intercourse with animals, are all known to have been part of pagan worship in Egypt, Canaan and elsewhere.”

    If that is so, then the Bible does recognize sexual intercourse with the same sex.

    The next article is about Old Testament passages that deals with same sex sexual intercourse. I will try to interact with your work as much as possible.

    I am looking forward to your corrections to areas which I may have misrepresent pro-gay’s position. Thank you.

    Maranatha,
    Prayson

  5. You’re going to have a very difficult time “proving” your point #3 with people who know exegesis. Exegesis, of course is defined as getting out of the text what it originally meant to the author and to the original intended audience, without reading into the text the many traditional interpretations that may have grown up around it.

    I know where you’re coming from as I too held your same position for many years. But like many other evangelicals today, as well as the biblical scholars, theologians and religious leaders who have changed their mind on this issue, I too discovered that when examined closely and in their historical contexts, the standard canonical interpretations of the few passages that generally get appealed to in this debate do not survive close scrutiny. I did not arrive at this conclusion overnight and certainly do not expect anyone else to either.

    I submit that the Bible not only does not oppose what we know as homosexuality, but also does not even recognize its existence. There was no such thing as “homosexuality” and “heterosexuality” per se. Those categories were not even on the radar screen — so they were never what was being discussed. To insist otherwise is to squirt our later-day prejudices into the biblical text, wearing the fig leaf of biblical authority.

    A couple of posts of mine to illustrate the point:

    “A Good Life in the Closet?” deals, in part, with the often quoted passage of Leviticus in context. Link:

    “Romans 1: What Was Paul Ranting About?” and “Romans 2: Paul’s Bait and Switch” deal with the first and second chapter of Romans here and [here], respectively.

    “Why No One in the Biblical World Had a Word for Homosexuality” deals with why I submit that not only does the Bible not oppose what we know as homosexuality, but also does not even recognize its existence. Link:here

    And lastly, “When Truth is Too Costly” deals with why it is often so difficult for people to come to terms with the notion that what they have been taught about these passages may be wrong. Link: here
    I would welcome your thoughts on these. We all have things to learn and we all have things to unlearn.

    -Alex Haiken
    http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

  6. So basically you still have to prove point 3, right? cause that is the argument I have most trouble with. The rest I totally agree with. Although it seems tougher to me if you find the love of your life and you really want to spend the rest of your lives together and want to be faithful etc that you’re not allowed to have that because, well, you just weren’t that lucky when the preferences got handed out 😉 because I think it’s a huge difference if you once in a while have to resist sinning (e.g. would be easy to lie, resist cheating on your wife, etc) but if that is the case for the thing that would make you most happy,… I’m just refusing to label that sin. I’m too afraid to declare something as unholy whereas God might think differently about it. But thanks for your response and I’m looking forward to see how you tackle point 3!
    All the best, sharon

    • Toda lach((תודה לך)) Sharon,

      I can not express how grateful I am for having you back commenting.

      (3) is the important premise in this argument and the crux of this series of articles, the point to which I will try to tackle.

      If I succeed to show that (3) is true, then we are logically force to accept the conclusion, homosexual behavior is wrong, even though it might seem tougher.

      Maranatha,
      Prayson

      • Hi Prayson,

        I guess I have to agree with Alex that it will be pretty hard to prove point 3. So you can try to convince me,… Let’s see if you succeed 😉

        But nevertheless: it’s good that you think about these topics and try to find out what the truth is. Just keep in mind that you’re talking about people and their lifestyle. And to be honest: who are we to judge? I don’t believe that we should judge at all (James 4, 11-12). The thing I find most annoying about the whole gay-christian-debate is the argument that being gay is a sickness that can be healed. So I’m glad that you’re not on that track and that you are really trying to find out what the bible says. That’s awesome.
        Blessings,
        Sharon

  7. So if you say, that homosexual behavior is a sin, you ask homosexual people to have feelings and longings their whole life and not act upon it? Does sound a little unnatural to me.
    I’m no theologian or anything like that but a friend of mine made a documentary on gay people looking for a church and he went to different churches and observed how they treated gay people. In one episode he actually went to a gay church and asked them how they justified living like this when the bible said something completely different about it. So the gay pastor explained that if you place the bible passages in their context, you can see that the letter is written to people, who lived in a society where it was common to have some ‘lustboys’ (young boys who were just for a man’s pleasure). So what the bible actually says that this part of the Greek culture is sinful. But according to their interpretation two men (or women for that matter) who live in a healthy, trusting and truthful relationship are not sinning. I -as everybody here- don’t know what God’s intentions on that subject really are, but this sounds very plausible to me and it fits with what I think of God, as loving caring father.
    And of course there is the argument of the anatomy – that woman and man are purposed to be with each other. I agree with it, that that was the intention before the fall of man. But I would add it to the list of things like menstrual pains, pain at giving birth etc. They are not intended in the original plan, but they aren’t sin either.
    So this is my point of view, as a Christian.
    Cheers, Sharon

    • Thanks Sharon,

      I am moved by your concern and tune of your comment. It is my aim in this series to walk through the passages and see if our wonderful gays do “really” have a justification for practicing homosexual behavior.(Hang on as we explore the Greek and Hebrew terms)

      Your first question mixes homosexual orientation(feeling and longing desire for the same sex) with the homosexual practice(acting on that feeling). We are all sinners and do have feeling and desires(longing) that we ought not to act upon.

      A typical arguments against pro-gay would go like this:

      (1) We are all obligated to do God’s will.

      (2) God’s will is expressed in the Bible.

      (3) The Bible forbids homosexual behavior.

      (4) Therefore, homosexual behavior is against God’s will, or is wrong.

      In this series I would try to show that (3) is true, thus if (1) and (2) are also true, then it does sound natural to me(+ ought to be so with all of us) that homosexual behavior is sinful.

      Maranatha,
      Prayson

  8. I think we have to be more cautious about making such sweeping statements and assumptions about the “Christian perspective” on homosexuality as if to imply that all Christians hold the same opinion. That is a bit grandiose. All Christians are not antigay any more than all gay people spend all their free time doing designer drugs in the urban club scene and are promiscuous. Fact is some of us, like myslef, are both gay AND Christian. Thankfully such long-standing notions such as “homosexuality is an abomination”, “the homosexual is a sinner” and “homosexuality is condemned in both the Old and New Testaments” are being widely debated among evangelicals today and seriously challenged by biblical scholars, theologians and religious leaders everywhere.

    If we, as gay people are going to hold to stereotypes of all Christians and imply they all feel the same way and believe the same things, then we’re no better than the Christians who hold to inaccurate stereotypes about us as gay people.

    Since I happen to speak and write on this very topic I thought perhaps you might find some of these posts of interest.

    -Alex Haiken
    http://JewishChristianGay.wordpress.com

    • Thanks Alex,

      Indeed you are right that we should be cautious about making “sweeping statements”. I am not assuming that all Christians hold the same opinion on homosexual practice. I am aware that, there are many gays who are orthodox in all areas but homosexual practice.

      I would not get ahead of myself in answering the second part, I would serve it to when I go through all passages that deals with homosexual practices.

      I do hope that we will discuss this topic with gentleness, respect and full of the spirit of love as we try to find what the Scriptures has to say about homosexual practices.

      BTW: Thank you for the link(Perhaps I would interact with it in the future)

      Maranatha,
      Prayson

  9. Important question: Why should anyone who isn’t a Christian care what the Christian perspective on homosexual conduct is? Assuming you think we should care, of course.

    • Fair question 🙂 Thank you so much

      1. Because homosexual conducts affects the society in general(which includes both those who believe in God and those who don’t).

      2. Some of the arguments against homosexual conducts I would present are religious neutral(secular arguments).

      3. Widens ones knowledge e.g. Why true Christians love, respect and care homosexuals, yet not pro-gays.

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