Foolish? A God That Has Been Born

I am always blown away by the Early Church’s battle for the full humanity of Christ Jesus.  Ebionites, a group of Greek-speaking Jewish Christians who rejected the virgin birth, opposed Paul “the messeger of Satan”  and his teachings, and viewed Christ Jesus not as God-man but  a unique human who assumed the role within the divine plan at his baptism, as an exception, the Early Christian’s theologians had to defend the full humanity of Christ Jesus in the pool of numerous errors that sprang as early Christians attempt to explain who Christ Jesus is.

Here is an example of Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus(c. 160 – c. 225 AD) against Marcion:

For no other reason than because one thus judges. It is of course foolish, if we are to judge God by our own conceptions. But, Marcion, consider well this Scripture, if indeed you have not erased it: “God hath chosen the foolish things of the world, to confound the wise.” Now what are those foolish things? Are they the conversion of men to the worship of the true God, the rejection of error, the whole training in righteousness, chastity, mercy, patience, and innocence? These things certainly are not “foolish.” Inquire again, then, of what things he spoke, and when you imagine that you have discovered what they are will you find anything to be so “foolish” as believing in a God that has been born, and that of a virgin, and of a fleshly nature too, who wallowed in all the before-mentioned humiliations of nature? But some one may say, “These are not the foolish things; they must be other things which God has chosen to confound the wisdom of the world.” And yet, a[c]cording to the world’s wisdom, it is more easy to believe that Jupiter became a bull or a swan, if we listen to Marcion, than that Christ really became a man.

How Tertullian argues leaves me open-mouthed.

The Ante-Nicene Fathers, Volume III: Latin Christianity: Its Founder, Tertullian. 1885 (A. Roberts, J. Donaldson & A. C. Coxe, Ed.) (524–525). Buffalo, NY: Christian Literature Company.

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